Diversity vs. monoculture in systems…Linux systems

Rachel Kroll explains potential pitfalls of oversimplifying when we automate. She advocates letting a few different solutions coexist and compete. There's some amount of waste that results; there's also a sizable amount of risk mitigation in a depth that would be truly hard to implement "on purpose" in a fully central plan.

Diversity is healthy in any system—this applies equally to agriculture, education, and software teams as well as Linux system administration.

Load path for a per-app namespace à la Corey Haines

Corey Haines, an exponent of dependency-free testing in Rails apps, has suggested that all custom app logic be moved into its own namespace, and that namespace get its own directory under app/. So a custom class Baz in an app called foobar would be namespaced as Foobar::Baz, and the code would live in app/foobar/baz.rb.

A slightly non-obvious consequence of this is that while Rails picks up all subdirectories of app/ in its class loading, it's expecting that any namespacing will occur inside those directories, not be expressed by those directory names themselves. If we just throw code in app/foobar/baz.rb, it will expect a top-level Baz class to be there, not Foobar::Baz.

One solution is to add a second foobar subdirectory, so the code would now live in app/foobar/foobar/baz.rb. That seems suboptimal.

Instead we can add app/ itself to config.autoload_paths in config/application.rb:

config.autoload_paths += %W( #{config.root}/app )

Then app/foobar becomes eligible to house code in the Foobar namespace.

Maxim Chernyak has a concise cheatsheet on Rails load paths that walks through the various gotchas lurking there.

Getting past “what do I do?”

It opens powerfully:
A number of years ago the abbot of a monastery answered my question of vocation — whether I should get married or become a monk — with the startling words, “God doesn’t care.” He then added, “God only cares that you seek first his kingdom.”
Still in the introduction it continues into very tough questions for anyone seeking to apply the Christian gospel:
Indeed, as Jesus instructs his disciples, we are not even to ask the questions “What shall we eat?” or “What shall we drink?” or “What shall we wear?” If we recognize that these questions are simply variations of the question “What shall we do?”, then we must face the notion that, according to Jesus, this kind of questioning is born out of anxiety and is not compatible with a life of discipleship. Regarding food, drink, clothing — and vocation — Jesus says clearly: seek first the Father’s kingdom and his righteousness and all these things shall be yours as well.
And that’s only getting started. The article is “Seek First His Kingdom”, by John Barnet of St. Vladimir’s Orthodox Theological Seminary.
A number of years ago the abbot of a monastery answered my question of vocation — whether I should get married or become a monk — with the startling words, “God doesn’t care.” He then added, “God only cares that you seek first his kingdom.” - See more at: http://www.hchc.edu/studentlife/vocation/octev_resources/229#sthash.CJfy7CFo.dpuf